Expanding the repertoire

The discussion on the French lute music playable on the harpsichord made me think about where to expand the repertoire. Of course Bach or Scarlatti are never enough, but we already know them fairly well and sometimes I feel the need for something “new”.
So, where to go hunting? XVI or XVII centuries, maybe? Can a forgotten great composer still come to light?
A good way to discover forgotten composers is Fernando De Luca’s website “La sala del cembalo”, Sala del Cembalo - The Harpsichord Archive, where he recorded more than 500 hours of harpsichord music (yes, it’s correct: five hundreds hours). A good thing is he writes what harpsichord and what temperaments he used in the various recordings.

Back to topic.
Graupner? (some music published by Prima la Musica publ., http://www.primalamusica.com/)
Mattheson? (still unpublished, I believe)
Abel?
Other obscure composers still obscure?

Lute and theorbo suites of Robert de Visee. Many transcriptions for harp are on imslp.
It is as if the essentials of Baroque suite movements given in a compressed, but very elegant manner. Then do with it what you dare.

I think that an awful lot of the early renaissance repertoire is unjustly neglected. Composers such as Ercole Pasquini, Andrea Antico, Marco Antonio Cavazzoni, Claudio Merulo, Giovanni Salvatore, Giovanni de Macque and Andrea Gabrieli spring to mind. Then others such as Pieter Cornet, Heinrich Scheidemann or Samuel Scheidt. Even the lesser well-known French composers whose music features in the Bauyn manuscript surely deserve more attention (Jacques Hardel, Jean-Nicolas Geoffroy, Etienne Richard, etc).
Best,
Matthew

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Rather than hunt for obscure and most likely second-rate composers for
our instrument, I think our best is to arrange first-rate music written
for other instruments, in particular the lute, but not only. Besides the
French 17th-century repertoire, and Dowland, of course, I think many of
Weiss’s pieces are well-suited to the harpsichord.

Many of Marin Marais’ pieces also sound good on the harpsichord. For
instance La Soligni, played by Skip Sempé:

Thomas Dent, who has recently joined, has made quite a few arrangements.
And I’m sure others here have done the same. It would be good if we
could find some easy way to share them among us (if such is their wish).

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“Thomas Dent, who has recently joined, has made quite a few arrangements.
And I’m sure others here have done the same. It would be good if we
could find some easy way to share them among us (if such is their wish).”

Yes, it should be great. Maybe Andrew can arrange something as a space? Don’t know if Discourse allows it.

Dom.

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Matthew,

Your list can be divided into several separate geographic areas, each of which ideally requires a different insrument. I can play Italian and early English music on my short and broken octave Italian, and at a pinch Sweelinck and Froberger. Bach and the rest is played on my G-d3 Franco-Flemish, though this is not 100% adequate for the French short octave repertoire, and it has a more appropriate timbre for Sweelinck and Froberger.

Those who wrote for chromatic instruments are in a further category.

I suspect that other members here run into the same problems.

David

Those who wrote for chromatic instruments are in a further category.

I suspect that other members here run into the same problems.

Which leads us to another evergreen problem: is using a “wrong” harpsichord as unacceptable as, say, playing Couperin or Gaetano Greco on the piano?

Most harpsichordists just own one harpsichord, I believe? (I am not sure), they must have studied Frescobaldi on their French double. Not ideal, of course, but how much far from the correct way of playing such music?

Dom

Well, you could always get a nice little Italian pentagonal spinet…

But what do you think Frescobaldi would say if he saw you playing his music on a French double?

FWIW, almost all my arrangements and transcriptions (eg Telemann keyboard ouvertures) are posted on IMSLP.