WTC I on the 1740 Haas (B. Alard)

Volume 6 of Benjamin Alard’s recording of Bach’s complete keyboard works features the first book of the WTC played on the 1740 Hieronymus Albrecht Haas harpsichord, ex-Puyana, now in Alan Rubin’s collection (Provins). Three manuals, 1x16, 2x8, 1x4, 1x2. It also includes the Clavierbüchlein für W.F. Bach played on a 1763 Johann Adolf Hass clavichord from the same collection.

1 Like

Thanks so much for this. Vol 6 not yet on Spotify or Apple Music, but all the others are. I am sad that the artist only makes milliicents per stream, but my house is packed to the rafters with physical CD’'s and I simply have not further space to store any new ones!

1 Like

Being sad is not an effective answer! Why not boycott those who refuse to pay the artists a fair return for their work and listen instead to the many CDs you already have? (What are you keeping the CDs for, otherwise?)
David

When possible, I purchase digital downloads rather than physical discs. Usually (not always, though) you get a PDF of the booklet and can often buy hi-res versions for better sound quality. Downloads solve the shelf space issue and give the artists more revenue.

Yes but this would translate in boycotting the players themselves as well, doesn’t it?

D

Let’s not hijack this thread with this chat, gents! Start a new one.

Le 13/02/2022 08:42, Dennis via The Jackrail écrit :

Volume 6 of Benjamin Alard’s recording of Bach’s complete keyboard works features the first book of the WTC played on the 1740 Hieronymus Albrecht Haas harpsichord, ex-Puyana, now in Alan Rubin’s collection (Provins). Three manuals, 1x16, 2x8, 1x4, 1x2. It also includes the Clavierbüchlein für W.F. Bach played on a 1763 Johann Adolf Hass clavichord from the same collection.

Video of the Hass played by Alard here:

Before watching this video, I hadn’t paid attention to the lid painting. Given the complexity and cost of this instrument, I suppose it’s not unreasonable to show it being presented it to a noble patron. What’s with the dude stepping down from the clouds? The only parallel I can think of is that in Virgil‘s Aeneid, Aeneas arrives at Dido’s court concealed in a cloud from which he emerges (not quite the same thing and not anything particularly to do with music). Overall a pretty wild painting.